iwasawasstrings:

condensedbloodmilk:

the-dragonblades-shadow:

sizvideos:

Video

//This began the rise of Aperture Science.

SPRTIZ THIS SHIT ON YOUR DICK AND YOUR E HARD FOR LIFE

That was the most Cave Johnson statement I’ve ever seen

scienceisbeauty:

"Spooky" Quantum Entanglement Reveals Invisible Objects (via National Geographics).

In the new experiment, the physicists entangled photons in two separate laser beams with different wavelengths, and hence color: one yellow and one red.[…] The team passed the red light beam through etched stencils and into cutouts of tiny cats and a trident, about 0.12 inches (3 millimeters) tall. The yellow beam traveled on a separate line, never hitting the objects. What’s more, the etched shapes were designed to be invisible to yellow light. […] After the red light passed by the objects, the physicists ran it together with the yellow laser beam at both parallel and right angles. The red light was then discarded, and the yellow light headed for a camera. There, that yellow light revealed a picture of the object. And a negative of the picture emerged from the light that had interfered at a right angle.

"The phenomena really arises from the interference of the photons together,” Lemos says. “It’s not that the red photons have changed the yellow ones, it’s that quantum mechanics says they have to share [wavelength] phases which we can detect to see a picture.”

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Nothing spooky (unless you consider nature is spooky), and nothing new because quantum entanglement is known (and accepted) from 1935 or so. But an interesting experiment anyway, of course.

(Source: katara)

(Source: pinkmei)

disappointingpopsiclejokes:

Disappointing Popsicle Jokes

disappointingpopsiclejokes:

Disappointing Popsicle Jokes

deducecanoe:

securelyinsecure:

Meet Jedidah Isler

She is the first black woman to earn a PhD in astronomy from Yale University.

As much as she loves astrophysics, Isler is very aware of the barriers that still remain for young women of color going into science. “It’s unfortunately an as-yet-unresolved part of the experience,” she says. She works to lower those barriers, and also to improve the atmosphere for women of color once they become scientists, noting that “they often face unique barriers as a result of their position at the intersection of race and gender, not to mention class, socioeconomic status and potentially a number of other identities.”

While Isler recounts instances of overt racial and gender discrimination that are jaw-dropping, she says more subtle things happen more often. Isler works with the American Astronomical Society’s commission on the status of minorities in astronomy.

She also believes that while things will improve as more women of color enter the sciences, institutions must lead the way toward creating positive environments for diverse student populations. That is why she is active in directly engaging young women of color: for example participating in a career exploration panel on behalf of the Women’s Commission out of the City of Syracuse Mayor’s Office, meeting with high-achieving middle-school girls. She is also on the board of trustees at the Museum of Science and Technology (MOST).

“Whether I like it or not, I’m one of only a few women of color in this position,” she says. “Addressing these larger issues of access to education and career exploration are just as important as the astrophysical work that I do.”

Learn more:

fantastic. I hope she goes big.

touchedbyanangela:

sorry kids you’re either going to have to get a job or go to uni
oh but uni’s probably going to cost you more so you’ll need to do both
also we don’t have enough jobs for you

(Source: leelinschin)

the manuscripts of the masters: scientists

albert einstein, ph.d., physics
marie curie, ph.d., physics, chemistry
nikola tesla, electrical&mechanical engineering
george washington carver, m.s., botany
rosalind franklin, ph.d., biophysics
charles darwin, evolutionary biology
thomas edison, electrical&mechanical engineering