Do not worry about continuity—it will always be satisfied by anything you can construct (wise-guys who like using the axiom of choice will have to worry about it, along with wolves under the bed, etc).

Armageddon only happens once, you know. They don’t let you go round again until you get it right.

Armageddon only happens once, you know. They don’t let you go round again until you get it right.

(Source: justapairofemptyframes)

hockpock:

qualiachameleon:

rocketumbl:

Theo Jansen  Strandbeest

Side note: These don’t have motors. They’re completely momentum/wind-powered and literally just wander around beaches unsupervised like giant abstract monsters.

these are both amazing and COMPLETELY TERRIFYING

mathematica:

Yesterday, two of my friends and I finally went to the National Museum of Mathematics — MoMATH — downtown in Manhattan, New York. MoMATH is located across 26th Street from Madison Square Park, and after yesterday, I’d definitely recommend it to anyone, regardless of age or experience with math. I had a lot of fun, and I absolutely think my knowledge of mathematics enhanced, not diminished, my appreciation for museum content.

In my mind, there are a number of reasons why MoMATH is important, and why it should be a cornerstone of any trip to New York:

  1. I’m a huge fan of museums of science, but I think it’s a good thing to have a museum just for mathematics. There is something unique to mathematics, a certain drive towards understanding beyond the world, that an appreciation for science, in all its glory, cannot muster.
  2. MoMATH in particular is engineered in a way that’s accessible to people of all ages. The activities and exhibits themselves are clearly designed for children — with the exception of the art exhibit Composite, which is clearly designed for a more critical audience, and the “puzzle cafe,” for which adult patience and/or guidance is essential — but each has a nearby computer display with an easy-to-understand explanation including more advanced mathematics.
  3. People, especially young children, deserve the chance to experience math in the right way — by exploring patterns and structure in the world for themselves, not by learning arithmetic by rote. And if that experience can’t be effected in the classroom just yet, what better place than a museum dedicated to generating it?

[CJH]

Have any of you guys been to MoMATH? What’d you think? How about anyone who hasn’t been yet — what are your thoughts? Do you think mathematics is something you can capture, at least in part, in a museum?

thatscienceguy:

Math is Beautiful, math is the absolute truth and that makes it beautiful. Mathematicians even go so far as calling it an art form. 

mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty — a beauty cold and austere, like that of sculpture, without appeal to any part of our weaker nature, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music, yet sublimely pure, and capable of a stern perfection such as only the greatest art can show - Bertrand Russel 

One of the most amazing equations, in my opinion, is the Lorentz factor, 

Virtually all of the mathematics behind Einsteins theory or special relativity can be reduced back to this one, simple equation. basically, these few lines describe exactly what happens when you travel close to the speed of light, and the fact that it is as simple and short as it is, is beautiful.

thatscienceguy:

Math is Beautiful, math is the absolute truth and that makes it beautiful. Mathematicians even go so far as calling it an art form. 

mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty — a beauty cold and austere, like that of sculpture, without appeal to any part of our weaker nature, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music, yet sublimely pure, and capable of a stern perfection such as only the greatest art can show - Bertrand Russel 

One of the most amazing equations, in my opinion, is the Lorentz factor, 

Virtually all of the mathematics behind Einsteins theory or special relativity can be reduced back to this one, simple equation. basically, these few lines describe exactly what happens when you travel close to the speed of light, and the fact that it is as simple and short as it is, is beautiful.

It’s going to look like - and this is a technical term, here - a bunch of random gobbledygook.
I’m not good with numbers.

(Source: sandandglass)

(Source: iguanamouth)

Heine-Borel is the kind of theorem that is essential for your life. I mean, you can handle doing grocery shopping without Bolzano-Weierstrass, but you would never succeed without Heine-Borel.